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Unique Fellowship, Part 8

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Unique Fellowship, Part 8

Already applied for the NSF and the EPA Star? Interested in applying for some other fellowships, maybe ones that no one else in your school has heard of before? In this eighth installment of an occasional series I’ll share some of the more unique fellowships to come across my desk.

The Alan Lomax Fellowship in Folklife Studies is the most unusual thing that I’ve seen recently. Offered by the Library of Congress’ Kluge Center, the fellowship program is intended for scholars interested in conducting advanced post-doctoral research on the Lomax collection. From the Library of Congress:

The Lomax Collection is a major collection of ethnographic field audio recordings, motion pictures, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence and other materials that represent Lomax’s lifetime of work to document and analyze traditional music, dance, storytelling and other expressive genres that arise from cultural groups in many parts of the world, particularly the United States, England, Scotland, Ireland, Italy, Spain, and the Caribbean. Lomax (1915-2002) was one of the greatest documenters of traditional culture during the twentieth century.

The fellowship offers a monthly $4,200 stipend for up to (but no more than) eight months. Applications are due by February 28th. See the Library of Congress’ website for more information.

Photo Credit: HB Art via Creative Commons

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Unusual Fellowships, Part 7

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Unusual Fellowships, Part 7

Already applied for the NSF and the EPA Star? Interested in applying for some other fellowships, maybe ones that no one else in your school has heard of before? In this seventh installment of an occasional series I’ll share some of the more unique fellowships to come across my desk.

This month: the International Fellowship in Graduate Research for Adapting Livestock Systems to Climate Change

Fellows will be expected to become specialists who can contribute to research regarding the adaptation of livestock systems to climate change in the LCC CRSP countries of focus (Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali, Senegal, Nepal, and Tajikistan). Selected fellows must propose to conduct research in one or more of the focus countries. In this way, the LCC CRSP aims to build research capacity.

The fellowship offers a stipend of $20,000 per year for up to 3 years. Applications are due by March 31st. More information here.

Photo Credit: HB Art via Creative Commons

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Unusual Fellowships Part 6

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Unusual Fellowships Part 6

Already applied for the NSF and the EPA Star? Interested in applying for some other fellowships, maybe ones that no one else in your school has heard of before? In this sixth installment of an occasional series I’ll share some of the more unique fellowships to come across my desk.

This month: the Manatt Fellowship, which supports research on democracy-making. The wrinkle? Only graduate students attending institutions in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wisconsin are eligible.

The fellowship offers $5,000. Applications are due by March 1st. More information here.

Photo Credit: HB Art via Creative Commons

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Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program Pledges Aid to Japanese Firefighters

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Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program Pledges Aid to Japanese Firefighters

In the wake of the devastating Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program has pledged up to $5000 in support for Japanese firefighters impacted by the tragedy there. The donations are going to the Japanese Firefighter Association, an organization which donated to 9/11 relief efforts and annually assists with training volunteers. Just ‘like’ them on their facebook page, and they’ll donate another ten cents. Or you can donate directly to the Japanese Firefighter Association via the paypal link on the National Volunteer Fire Council (NVFC)’s website. From the Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program’s facebook page:

We are deeply saddened by the tragedies in Japan. In addition to our ongoing support for the U.S. fire service, we also want to support firefighters in Japan who are facing unimaginable adversities right now. For each new “like” of our page through March 24th, we’ll donate 10 cents (with a max of $5,000) to the Japan Firefighters Association. Please spread the word.

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Extent of Deforestation’s Impact on Mount Kilimanjaro

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Extent of Deforestation’s Impact on Mount Kilimanjaro

In an article published 2/15 in the Journal of Geophysical Research, Dr. Udaysankar Nair found that Mt. Kilimanjaro’s glaciers, which are more then 12,000 years old, have dramatically shrunk in size over the last century. Not good news. From a blog post on the article in ScienceDaily:

At their maximum, the mountain’s glaciers and ice cap covered about 400 square kilometers and reached from the summit (19,298 feet above sea level) to the surrounding plain more than 9,000 feet below. About 16,000 years ago, during the most recent ice age, Kilimanjaro’s glaciers covered up to 150 square kilometers.

A tiny fraction of that ice cap still exists. Surveys in the 1880s estimated that glaciers covered about 20 square kilometers on the mountain. From 1912 to now, the glacier area on Kilimanjaro has decreased from 12 square kilometers to less than two.

Photo Credit Greg Annandale via Creative Commons

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