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Unusual Fellowships Part 6

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Unusual Fellowships Part 6

Already applied for the NSF and the EPA Star? Interested in applying for some other fellowships, maybe ones that no one else in your school has heard of before? In this sixth installment of an occasional series I’ll share some of the more unique fellowships to come across my desk.

This month: the Manatt Fellowship, which supports research on democracy-making. The wrinkle? Only graduate students attending institutions in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wisconsin are eligible.

The fellowship offers $5,000. Applications are due by March 1st. More information here.

Photo Credit: HB Art via Creative Commons

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Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program Pledges Aid to Japanese Firefighters

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Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program Pledges Aid to Japanese Firefighters

In the wake of the devastating Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program has pledged up to $5000 in support for Japanese firefighters impacted by the tragedy there. The donations are going to the Japanese Firefighter Association, an organization which donated to 9/11 relief efforts and annually assists with training volunteers. Just ‘like’ them on their facebook page, and they’ll donate another ten cents. Or you can donate directly to the Japanese Firefighter Association via the paypal link on the National Volunteer Fire Council (NVFC)’s website. From the Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program’s facebook page:

We are deeply saddened by the tragedies in Japan. In addition to our ongoing support for the U.S. fire service, we also want to support firefighters in Japan who are facing unimaginable adversities right now. For each new “like” of our page through March 24th, we’ll donate 10 cents (with a max of $5,000) to the Japan Firefighters Association. Please spread the word.

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Extent of Deforestation’s Impact on Mount Kilimanjaro

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Extent of Deforestation’s Impact on Mount Kilimanjaro

In an article published 2/15 in the Journal of Geophysical Research, Dr. Udaysankar Nair found that Mt. Kilimanjaro’s glaciers, which are more then 12,000 years old, have dramatically shrunk in size over the last century. Not good news. From a blog post on the article in ScienceDaily:

At their maximum, the mountain’s glaciers and ice cap covered about 400 square kilometers and reached from the summit (19,298 feet above sea level) to the surrounding plain more than 9,000 feet below. About 16,000 years ago, during the most recent ice age, Kilimanjaro’s glaciers covered up to 150 square kilometers.

A tiny fraction of that ice cap still exists. Surveys in the 1880s estimated that glaciers covered about 20 square kilometers on the mountain. From 1912 to now, the glacier area on Kilimanjaro has decreased from 12 square kilometers to less than two.

Photo Credit Greg Annandale via Creative Commons

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Unusual Fellowships, Part 5

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Unusual Fellowships, Part 5

Already applied for the NSF and the EPA Star? Interested in applying for some other fellowships, maybe ones that no one else in your school has heard of before? In this fifth installment of an occasional series I’ll share some of the more unique fellowships to come across my desk.

This month: fellowships for foresters! I just heard about two very interesting PhD fellowship opportunities at Utah State University in forestry. They are reviewing applications now but the opportunity is open until they award two fellowships, so get cracking! The fellowship offers $24,000/yr of assistance for three years starting in Fall 2011. If you are selected to receive the fellowship, you must also apply to the university. From their Project Summary (PDF), available on their website:

Our goal is to create a small cohort of forestry graduate students whose research will be linked under the theme “Managing for Resilience in Forested Ecosystems of the Intermountain West”. This program will use emerging research tools, common coursework, seminars and specific shared extension projects to provide the student fellows with skills and knowledge necessary for effective science-based input to management decisions about forested landscapes undergoing or threatened with large-scale change. Current topics related to management, adaptation and resiliency of forest ecosystems and their components in a changing climate will be emphasized.
The application process is pretty simple. Send Dr. Karen Mock (karen.mock@usu.edu) the following materials:
  • A resume describing your education, employment, and publication/presentation history,
  • A list of three references (and their contact information),
  • A copy of your academic transcripts (unofficial) and GRE scores,
  • A cover letter describing your research interests and why you would be a good candidate for this Fellowship.

Photo Credit: HB Art via Creative Commons

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Unique Fellowships, Part 4

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Unique Fellowships, Part 4

Already applied for the NSF and the EPA Star? Interested in applying for some other fellowships, maybe ones that no one else in your school has heard of before? In this fourth installment of an occasional series I’ll share some of the more unique fellowships to come across my desk.

The year’s most unusual fellowship to date has to be the MLA Bibliography Fellowship. Designed to recognize the efforts of scholars providing citations to the MLA. Potential fellows must be interested in being trained as field bibliographers and be willing to submit 100 citations each year. The fellowship has a three-year term, at the end of which fellows receive $500 and a certificate of completion at the MLA convention.

Applications are due by April 1st. If you’re interested in applying, here are the instructions:

Please submit a letter of request, including qualifications and reasons for applying for the fellowship, and a current résumé or CV. Materials may be sent to Helen Slavin, MLA International Bibliography, 26 Broadway, 3rd floor, New York, NY 10004-1789 (hslavin@mla.org).

Photo Credit: HB Art via Creative Commons

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